Thanks, Barbara. I do agree we need to attempt putting the skids on the “mad scientist” and rapacious parts of this. However there are also some “natural”—if I can use that word in this context—limitations already in place. Machines simply cannot think. They are capable of replicating human processes given enough information but they cannot literally do what humans do on their own.

The problem Musk and his people are confronting is overcoming this barrier. Good luck. Machines do not know how to interact with their own experiences and learn from them in order to grow in ways they were not programed to grow. Even if they were taught to program themselves—something technicians are currently working on—they are still reliant upon THAT programming.

Yet another limitation they cannot move beyond.

If we ever reach the stage, a theoretical one, where machines can somehow begin programing each other for future needs and changes, then they will replace us because they will no longer need us. That is science fiction, still.

Machines will be replacing human workers at a high rate, however, and quickly, and this is something governments will have to deal with if they are to remain stable. And this matter of resources is crucial. The first order of business, as my friend Lisa Mazzon points out here, is getting a handle on Ewaste and recycling it.

https://medium.com/@lisa.mazzon/surfing-the-e-waste-tsunami-caldo-d8ef7aad90ec

Possessor of Paul Newman eyes. Author of the straightforward & strange. “Women zai shuo ba.” Be useful; share what you can; help others always. Doctor of texts.

Possessor of Paul Newman eyes. Author of the straightforward & strange. “Women zai shuo ba.” Be useful; share what you can; help others always. Doctor of texts.